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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the name of science? >> some people are. this is a pretty good story and a talker none the less. the new experiment doctors are conducting that has some people eating their favorite fast food meals over and over again. >>> plus also hundreds of cancellations and delays this morning as american airlines faces more problems. we're going to tell you what inspectors have been doing that has several planes out of service. >>> hi, everyone. today we've got all your favorite reality tv stars in one place. i'm talking to the original reality mom kate gosselin and she'll open up about her life after that hit show. the dance moms will be here and the guys from gold rush are going to teach us how to strike it rich. it should be a lot of fun. i'll see you later today on "katie." it's time to change the way we clean. it's time to free ourselves from the smell and harshness of bleach. and free ourselves from worrying about the ones we love. new lysol power & free has more cleaning power than bleach. how? the secret is the hydrogen peroxide formula. it attacks tough stains and kills 99.9% of germs. n
degree is in medical technology. my family always wanted a doctor, and so i headed toward the sciences. and going to medical school was something that i knew would be beneficial to the "race," world race, my race. but my thinking was, "i don't want to be a doctor who paints. i think i want to be a painter." it was like i was already an artist, but i mean, i just, i sort of had to say that to myself. my first interest is in the structure of something. and so when i start out making something, i'm not thinking about who might have lived there. i'm thinking about how i want it to look. structure for me is number one. and then i will decide who might have lived there. somes i will move away frowhat i'm working on and look at it -- look back at it -- and move around it and look at it. it's a process of getting a fresh look at something. it's like working on a drawing and you back up to see what your perspective is. and you see how you're doing -- how if it's flowing the way you want it flow, if it's moving the way you want it to move. i bent the metal one way, and i saw that the top part wa
of marine science says the pace of damages kicking up. cyclones of predatory starfish are the main causes along with: gas shipments and global warming. >> coral reefs provide the breeding ground for countless species of fish. the great barrier reef is no exception. commercial fishing is now mostly banned across much of the area. three 6 cents more than 2,600 kilometers along the us trillion coast. the northern part of the refinements largely intact. it is the southern part scientists are worried about. severe storms are said to have cost nearly 50 percent -- said to have caused nearly 50% of the damage. a further 40% was caused by starfish that feed on the coral. one species, the crown of thorns, has proven especially deadly for the coral cover. >> we believe if we can take action on one of the things we can directly control, the crown of thorns starfish, it may leave the reef in a position where it can better withstand some of the climatic impact spite cyclone and coral bleaching. >> regardless of what is causing the damage, brain biologists say action needs to be taken now to save the r
classes in advance science and math and one day you will know her as dr. dan yes. >> medicine has always been in the family. >> it was her dad that made the biggest difference. he told her to visit haiti. she collected balls, cleats, jerseys and went over there packed with good feelings. >> soccer was something that was really important to them even though they didn't have the nicest cleats or the nicest equipment but they -- they felt really good after we gave them stuff and we felt better. >> what did she learn? >> appreciate a lot more that iv. >> what we have here is a star. on and off the field. congratulations to the first belaire honda student athlete of the week. >> great story. >> great if you know an outstanding student like that who you think should be the high school student athlete of the week head to the website right now, click on the link on the right hand received the page to submit your nomination. >> great story. >> coming up tonight after world news you have to check out the show the list. here is a sneak peek of what they are working on for you tonight. >>
the world by preparing a hundred thousand additional... math and science teachers; training two million... americans with the job skills they need at our community... colleges; cutting the growth of tuition in half and... expanding student aid so more americans can afford it. fourth, a balanced plan to reduce our deficit by... four trillion dollars over the next decade, on top of the... trillion in spending we've already cut. i'd ask e wealthy to pay a little more. and as we end the war in afghanistan... let's apply half the savings to pay down our debt and... use the rest for some nation-building... right here at home. it's time for a new economic patriotism, rooted in the... belief that growing our economy begins with a strong... thriving middle class. read my plan. compare it to governor romney's, and decide for yourself. thanks for listening. i'm barack obama and i approve this message. >> we have several big stories tonight, including a deadly crash in spotsylvania county. what investigators have learned so far. plus we're learning about the strange man -- the estrang
in los cabos mexico and he is co-founder of the new england institute for cognitive science and evolutionary studies, associate professor of philosophy and religious studies at the university of new england. he has been an unflagging student of how human beings make their way ine world, even though that way is often not great. he challenges each reader to tinker with their own wiring, to be aware and he hopes to do better. for his profound insights into the human condition, and into the conditions some humans place on play some others, we present him the anisfeld-wolf book award for nonfiction. [applause] ♪ ♪ >> the this is wonderful. and i deeply appreciate the fact that such a distinguished jury read my book, much less thought it worthy of this great honor. in a moment i i'm going to read you an excerpt from "less than human," which deals of course with the atrocities of the past, but i think it's useful to remind ourselves of the point of considering atrocities of the past is to make a better future. if we can understand what has driven us to do the terrible things t
will be developed by a school teacher? >> yes. there's an entire line of science toys, encouraging girls to get involved in science. there's journals, online, interactivity way to get kids hooked on science. >> reporter: this comes from the d.c. area. word around. >> this is a travel game you can take with you. for older kids and adults. moves quick. it's a lot of fun. >> reporter: now let's talk about younger kids. >> this is an active game. based on disney fairies. you put them around the house. girls will pull one of these out of the bag. when you get to fairy, you run around the house and try to grab as many as you can. they're up and active. this is green toys, made of 100% recycled plastic. it's waterproof so kids can take it in the bath. not only can you control the car, you can play music now. i have all my songs downloaded on itunes. then i can open up the doors of the car and the car becomes a speaker. >> reporter: blue tooth from the device to the vehicle? >> yeah. you can drive it, may your music and it's kind of fun. >> reporter: really by moving the ipad around will steer the car.
? the truth is that highly skilled immigrants with degrees in science, technology, engineering and math, aka, the stem jobs create jobs for other americans. according to one study from 2000 to 2007 for every 100 foreign born workers who earned an advanced stem degree here in the united states and went on to work in those fields, that created an additional 262 jobs for native born americans. instead of embracing this the u.s. immigration policy sends those highly skilled immigrants many of them educated in the best american colleges and universities back home to their countries of origin so they can create jobs there competing against the u.s. by the way in the global economy. it's called the reverse brain drain. joining me is a director of research at duke university and a fellow at stamford law school and the author of "the immigrant exodus, why america is losing the global race to capture entrepreneurial talent." from 1995 to 2005 immigrants founded more than a quarter of all tech and engineering startups in united states and more than 52% of those in silicon valley. you just updated the n
. but us start the national academy of sciences. let us start colleges. because we want to give the gateways of -- date was of opportunities for all americans. all americans are getting opportunities, that enhances people's freedom. what i have tried to do as president is to apply those same principles. >> that is president obama from the debate this week on the role of government. let us listen to his challenger mitt romney with his answer. and then we will begin listening to you. [video clip] >> have a responsibility to and libertiesthe lives of the american people. in another one that says we are endowed by our creator with our rights, i believe we must maintain our commitment to religious tolerance and freedom in this country. the statement also says that we are endowed by our creator with the right to pursue happiness as we choose. i interpret that as one making sure that those people who are less fortunate that cannot care for themselves are cared for by one another. we are a nation of belize we are all children of the same god. and we care for those that have difficulties
and making fun of each other while we are in the science fair together. >> together they applied their skills to find ways to save their school districts tens of thousands of colors in energy costs. something the las of 1936 never had to worry about. >> it's baby steps you have to take to lead to a big difference. it's what you have to do. every light switch counts. >> for example, this lamp is an older system. it's about one and a half inches in diameter and uses more energy than newer models. >> their cool, they know it best, and they can help us out with specific counts and specific information. the project was made 'baseball pg&e innovator pilot program wherein saytors like duane are brought on board to do an energy audit. in this case he was teamed with those who know the campus best, the members of the green engineering academy. >> that measure we identified was about 100,000kwh of annual savings which i think is $14,000 for the school each year that they would save. >> the students were able to identify more than 45 quad lamps, multiple thermostats and old computers that were outdated
. >>shepard: doctor, never thought about that one. >> that's science for you. >>shepard: everything will be harmful soon. thank you, doctor. >> the man behind brian griffin will host the biggest event in all of hollywood, and now a new gig hosting the oscars. [ man ] ring ring... progresso this reduced sodium soup says it mahelp lower cholesterol, how does it work? you just he to eat it as part of your heart healthy diet. step 1. eat the soup. all those veggies and beans, that's what may help lower your cholesterol and -- well that's easy [ male announcer ] progresso. you gotta taste this soup. i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it could save you thousands in ou
government president -- wow -- adam rotti who is studying political science. >> all right. are you ready? >> question one. >> yes. >> which of the following is not a college mascot? "a," the fighting pickle? "b" -- >> keep going. keep going. >> banana slug, the leafy sea dragons or the trolls? >> go. >> the leafy thing. >> the leafy sea dragon. university of georgia school of the arts. while the trolls are from trinity college. question two. in the climactic scene in the film "rudy," what football team is notre dame playing when rudy finally gets in the game? university of southern california? georgia tech? university of michigan? or "d," university of tennessee? >> get it right. >> come on, you're on your own. >> michigan. >> not university of michigan. what do you think? >> georgia tech? >> georgia tech. okay. next question. listen up. on the periodic table of elements, the symbols "k" and "h" each stand for what? is it -- >> oh, oh! >> tennessee. >> natural resources. >> helium, carbon and mercury, potassium and hydrogen or krypton and hydrogen? >> potassium and hydrogen. >> it's pota
years of english, three years of science, math, and social science, compared to those who didn't complete a core curriculum, those who completed the core curriculum scored 144 points higher than those who did not. when we look at those who took honors courses, they scored nearly 300 points above those who did not take honors or ap courses. rigor of the academic course load in high school leads to do better on the s.a.t. and leads students to being better prepared for college. let me give you this information in terms of framing the challenge of our country faces. for every 100 ninth graders, only 70 will graduate from high school. 44 local want to college. only 30 students will enroll in the second year of college. only 21 will graduate from a four-year institution in a six- year period of time. that is not good enough to keep the united states competitive in a global economy. we are very much focused on having high expectations for all students and doing what we can to better prepare students for college success and keep those high expectations for all students coming from all
in things like education, making sure that we are continuing to invest in basic science and research. >> guys, he was flat in the performance why? >> no teleprompter. really in >> absolutely. >> why else, tell me . >> no passion. >> explain that. >> he didn't have enthusiasm for what he was talking about and he didn't feel strongly. >> you guys agree with that? >> yes. >> he is contemplating a bit. he has his record that he can't talk about. >> he couldn't defend his record and he couldn't get near his record. so how could he defend it? >> why do you say that. >> romney had facts and statistics and obama had generalities of helping people and feeling good, but not the tools to implement what had to be done. >> i mean, romney didn't have that man facts but obama did. i will give you obama is tired and he's president and it is a rough time and he knows he's president. and he aged 10-20 years and he's doing. and give you a little lack of energy, when he's out there. >> all rightt for the record, ken. you have more energy that barack obama. now we are coming back to you a little laterr o
his dog and uses science to bring him back to life. and liam neeson comes back with revenge in the sequel to 2008's "taken." he takes on killers seeking revenge for a murder committed in the first film. you can see reviews for both movies at myfoxdc.com. >>> a any of the-year franchise still going strong. today marks five decades since james bond hit the big screen in the classic film "dr. no." sean connery filled the shoes in that first one. daniel craig now plays bond. he'll be back in theaters next month in "skyfall." it's the 23rd official film. >> amazing. >>> on this friday morning we have a lot for you still coming up. but coming up next, comedian and radio show host, tom papa -- >> papa. >> you got me all jacked up. >> i did it to you, sorry. papa is in town for a gig at the improve. is he smiling? he's still smiling. first he'll join us live instudio. >> will feel more like fall this weekend, so might be time for a world famous hay ride. good morning, sarah. >> reporter: good morning. we're at what seems to be the world famous cox farms this morning. and we are here
moderator. jenna: like him on that. gregg: let's recruit him. sounds like something out of science fiction but scientists say they developed medical devices that dissolve safely inside the body. we'll have that story coming up or annuity over 10 or even 20 years? call imperial structured settlements. the experts at imperial can convert your long-term payout into a lump sum of cash today. jenna: some very interesting medical news for you. scientists say they have developed medical devices that do the work they're designed for on side your body and then, just dissolve. what happens to them? that is the question we have for dr. ernest patty, senior attending physician at st. barna bass hospital in the bronx. doctor, what are we talking about here? medical devices that dissolve, come on. >> small electronic devices. call them transient electronics made out of silicon and magnesium. they're covered in a silk cocoon. they use the silk because the silk is absorbed by the body as well as silicon and magnesium. jenna: what is scenario where someone may have a medical device you're describing? >> th
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)